People with Type 1 diabetes need daily insulin to survive and be well, but there are choices as to how it is delivered. Insulin pumps are currently used by about 6% of all Australians with Type 1 diabetes, including 60% of children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. Insulin pump use has been shown to be associated with major reductions in the risk of diabetic eye, kidney and cardiovascular disease and of death. There are rapid advances in the technology, with the latest being called a Hybrid Closed Loop Pump, in which insulin delivery is rapidly adjusted according to glucose levels measured by a special sensor the patient or carer inserts under the skin each week.  Led by Prof. David O’Neal a series of studies in Type 1 diabetes adults have led to better in-pump computer programs to control insulin delivery, and to test new glucose sensors.  Patient expectations, experiences, and effects on sleep, thinking capacity (cognition), driving and risk factors for long-term complications are also being assessed.  Positive results have been and will continue to be translated into clinical practice.

The Adult Hybrid Closed Loop Study (HCL) aims to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of long-term hybrid closed loop (HCL) insulin delivery vs standard therapy (MDI/CSII) to improve glycaemia, psychosocial well-being, sleep quality, cognition, and biochemical markers of vascular risk in people with type 1 diabetes.

Read the news article about the study, published by the University of Melbourne

See ANZCTR for full trial details >

 

Trial Summary:

The Adult Hybrid Closed Loop Study (HCL) aims to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of long-term hybrid closed loop (HCL) insulin delivery vs standard therapy (MDI/CSII) to improve glycaemia, psychosocial well-being, sleep quality, cognition, and biochemical markers of vascular risk in people with type 1 diabetes. The investigational device is a Medtronic MiniMed670G insulin pump HCL system. The treatment period is six months.

Supported By:

JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), University of Melbourne

Eligibility:

Type I Diabetics (for > 1 year) aged 25-70, on either multiple daily injections of insulin (≥4 injections/day), or on an insulin pump for ≥3 months.

Registration ID:

ACTRN12617000520336

Participation:

120 participants

Australian Lead Group:

The Trial is a collaborative study between the University of Melbourne, St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne, Deakin University and the University of Sydney. The CTC is responsible for Data Management and Translational Research.

Status:

Recruiting (due to close recruitment Feb 2019)

Activation Date:

10/04/2017

Chairs:

A/Prof David Norman O'Nea

Contact:

cls@ctc.usyd.edu.au